LGBT rights in Austria
Same-sex sexual acts have been legal since 1971. The age of consent was equalized in 2002 by a court decision. Homosexuals are not prohibited from military service in 2009.
In November 2009, the government coalition agreed in Council to allow registered partnerships, which provide equal rights in labour, immigration, pension, tax, and civil law to same-sex couples as marriage does to opposite-sex couples. They also allow for someone to change their surname to match their partner’s and take a common surname. On 10 December 2009, the National Council of Austria adopted the bill, with the votes of the representatives of the SPÖ and ÖVP, and on 18 December 2009 it was approved by the Bundesrat. It was published in the Federal Law Gazette I No. 135/2009 on 30 December 2009, and came into force on 1 January 2010. Since then, same-sex couples can have registered partnerships, but do not have the right to adopt children or access to IVF or artificial insemination treatments. On 4 January 2010, the first four same-sex couples were married in Vienna.
A European Union poll showed that 49% of Austrians supported gay marriage.
Some have argued that straight couples should also have access to registered partnerships as an analogous relationship recognition option, and that likewise, LGBT couples should have access to same-sex marriage.
The federal Labour Code has included an anti-discrimination law since 2004, to follow the implementation of EU legislation prohibiting discrimination. Six out of the nine federal republics have established anti-discrimination laws within their area of competence that also cover sexual orientation. The 1993 Police Security Act requires the police to refrain from any actions that could create the impression of bias or that could be perceived as discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation.
Vienna state has had its Youth Protection Law since 2002, and one city, Bludenz, has adopted a symbolic non-discrimination declaration which includes sexual orientation in 1998. The Federal Constitution theoretically protects all citizens equally but the reality is that it does not apply to sexual orientation and several judgements of the Constitutional Court confirm these unequal treatment.
The country, while dominated by Roman Catholicism, is slowly becoming more liberal with laws and social opinions concerning sexual orientation and gender identity.

LGBT rights in Austria

Same-sex sexual acts have been legal since 1971. The age of consent was equalized in 2002 by a court decision. Homosexuals are not prohibited from military service in 2009.

In November 2009, the government coalition agreed in Council to allow registered partnerships, which provide equal rights in labour, immigration, pension, tax, and civil law to same-sex couples as marriage does to opposite-sex couples. They also allow for someone to change their surname to match their partner’s and take a common surname. On 10 December 2009, the National Council of Austria adopted the bill, with the votes of the representatives of the SPÖ and ÖVP, and on 18 December 2009 it was approved by the Bundesrat. It was published in the Federal Law Gazette I No. 135/2009 on 30 December 2009, and came into force on 1 January 2010. Since then, same-sex couples can have registered partnerships, but do not have the right to adopt children or access to IVF or artificial insemination treatments. On 4 January 2010, the first four same-sex couples were married in Vienna.

European Union poll showed that 49% of Austrians supported gay marriage.

Some have argued that straight couples should also have access to registered partnerships as an analogous relationship recognition option, and that likewise, LGBT couples should have access to same-sex marriage.

The federal Labour Code has included an anti-discrimination law since 2004, to follow the implementation of EU legislation prohibiting discrimination. Six out of the nine federal republics have established anti-discrimination laws within their area of competence that also cover sexual orientation. The 1993 Police Security Act requires the police to refrain from any actions that could create the impression of bias or that could be perceived as discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation.

Vienna state has had its Youth Protection Law since 2002, and one city, Bludenz, has adopted a symbolic non-discrimination declaration which includes sexual orientation in 1998. The Federal Constitution theoretically protects all citizens equally but the reality is that it does not apply to sexual orientation and several judgements of the Constitutional Court confirm these unequal treatment.

The country, while dominated by Roman Catholicism, is slowly becoming more liberal with laws and social opinions concerning sexual orientation and gender identity.


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